Silicon India Magazine: Combating Phishing attacks through Human Resource

logo-healthcareinfosecurityA deep inside look at digital security threats and human behavior through various verticals. “Business firms seem to have forgotten that hackers target human vulnerability and weakness to break the organization,” says Rohyt Belani, Co-founder and CEO, PhishMe. “According to Belani, 95 percent of the organizations use the wrong mechanism to ensure security and do not train humans to be vigilant about the attacks.”
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PhishMe Continues to Dominate Phishing Threat Management and Intelligence Market with Malcovery Acquisition

Technology Integration Will Provide Enterprises with Most Advanced, High Fidelity Phishing Threat Intelligence Available

LEESBURG, Va. – October 14, 2015 – PhishMe® Inc., the leading provider of phishing threat management solutions, announced today that it has acquired key assets of phishing intelligence firm – Malcovery Security LLC, for an undisclosed sum.

Surfing the Dark Web: How Attackers Piece Together Partial Data

The recent Carefirst breach is just the latest in a rash of large-scale healthcare breaches, but the prevailing notion in the aftermath of this breach is that it isn’t as severe as the Anthem or Premera breaches that preceded it. The thinking is that the victims of this breach dodged a bullet here, since attackers only accessed personal information such as member names and email addresses, not more sensitive information like medical information, social security numbers, and passwords. However, attackers may still be able to use this partial information in a variety of ways, and a partial breach should not be dismissed as trivial.

Defining a Sophisticated Attack

What do nearly all of the recent high-profile data breaches have in common? They have all been traced to sophisticated threats and cyber criminals. While there are many disagreements in the security industry, after every significant breach nearly everyone agrees that it was sophisticated (Twitter, Apple, and the Department of Energy are some of the unfortunate organizations to be compromised by a sophisticated attack recently).

On the surface, it isn’t hard to see why. First, technology vendors need attackers to be super sophisticated, because simple tactics couldn’t circumvent their products, right? For victims of a breach, it is advantageous for it to seem as though it took a sophisticated actor to penetrate its network. And from the incident response standpoint, it behooves IR consultants to describe these breaches as ultra-sophisticated to help their customers save face.