VIDEO UPDATE: Wire Fraud Phisher attempts to phish PhishMe, instead gets phished by PhishMe

(VIDEO UPDATE LINK: Defending Against Phishing Attacks: Case Studies and Human Defenses by Jim Hansen
• A human centric method of defense
• Attack case studies & attacker technique analysis
• Proactive simulation methods: educating workforces & detecting / thwarting attacks) 

(^ say that title ten time fast)

Every year PhishMe Simulator sends millions of phishing emails to its 500+ enterprise customers’ employees worldwide. PhishMe is hands down the most robust and sophisticated phishing platform in existence. To say that we are a little obsessive about Phishing is a bit of an understatement. In fact, we are sitting on innovations in phishing that the bad guys have yet to figure out.

The difference in PhishMe emails versus the bad guys, is that ours are carefully crafted to deliver a memorable experience. Our experiences are masterfully designed to change human behavior to avoid phishing. So what happens when one of our own employees is on the receiving end of a wire fraud phish? Read on…

The Danger of Sensationalizing Phishing Statistics

People are often curious about what percentage of users will fall for a phishing attack, and it’s tempting to try to create this kind of statistic. At PhishMe, we’ve found that trying to assign a blanket statistic is counterproductive – however this hasn’t stopped others in the industry from trying to do so. The most recent company to try is Intel Security (formerly McAfee), which declared that 97% of people globally were unable to correctly identify phishing emails. While this statistic certainly makes for a nice headline, it is broad-based and flawed in a number of ways.

Three Ways Reporter Can Enhance Your Incident Response Process

Most of us have been in an airport and heard the announcement over the loud speaker; “If you see something, say something.”  The airport has security personnel; however, their agents cannot be everywhere at once.  They collectively rely on travelers passing through the airport to be their eyes and ears in places agents cannot be.  In this way, as an airport traveler, you are a “sensor” watching for, detecting, and alerting on suspicious behavior such as unoccupied luggage.

What does this have to do with information security? Just as passengers can help prevent an incident in the airport by reporting suspicious activity, employees can help prevent a data breach by reporting suspicious email. The key to unlocking this valuable source of threat intelligence is to simplify the reporting process for employees, and to measure the results of your program to prioritize reports from savvy users.