Dridex Code Breaking – Modify the Malware to Bypass the VM Bypass

Post Updated on March 25

The arrival of spring brings many good things, but it’s also prime season for tax-themed phishing emails. A partner of ours recently reported an email with the subject “Your Tax rebate” that contained an attachment with Dridex and password-protected macros to hinder analysis. If you read this blog, this story should sound familiar, but this particular strain took new precautions, such as adding a longer password and using VM detection inside of the code.

Dridex – Password Bypass, Extracting Macros, and Rot13

When attackers decide to password protect something, it can be very frustrating as an analyst, because we are often left with few options to find out what they are protecting. If this happens, we can always try to straight up brute force the password, but unless the attackers use something like 1q2w3e4r, we’re up a creek without an oar. If it’s an MD5 hash of a password, we have many more options to crack it. In the case of xls files, we have the option to essentially “wipe out” the password and give it our own password. In a recent wave of Dridex phishing emails, this is what we saw. Here’s the phishing email sent to one PhishMe employee: