PhishMe Continues to Dominate Phishing Threat Management and Intelligence Market with Malcovery Acquisition

Technology Integration Will Provide Enterprises with Most Advanced, High Fidelity Phishing Threat Intelligence Available

LEESBURG, Va. – October 14, 2015 – PhishMe® Inc., the leading provider of phishing threat management solutions, announced today that it has acquired key assets of phishing intelligence firm – Malcovery Security LLC, for an undisclosed sum.

National Cybersecurity Awareness Month 2014

With National Cyber Security Awareness month (NCSAM) upon us, the national spotlight is on best practices to stay safe and protect your data online. Thanks to the support of the National Cyber Security Alliance, Department of Homeland Security, and the White House , the month of October will feature a number of initiatives designed to increase the knowledge base about cyber security issues with the general population and promote DHS’ “Stop. Think. Connect.” program to empower individuals to be safer online. PhishMe is proud to participate by being a 2014 NCSAM champion, and have made a number of resources available to individuals looking to learn more about how to protect themselves from phishing, and to organizations trying to change their users’ behavior with more effective employee security training programs.

Negative reinforcement: How NOT to improve user behavior

One of the interesting aspects of security awareness training is the intersection of information security with human resources. We know from experience that security practitioners are not always experts in the latter, but what we recently saw from Dave Clemente was a real doozy.

Clemente suggested that employees who engage in unsafe IT security behavior (such as clicking on phishing links) be reprimanded and that unsafe behavior should even negatively affect their performance review. To the security part of your mind, it might feel good to punish people for their security sins. We need to remember, however, that the ultimate goal of security is to protect a network, not give users a reason to DDoS it.

For effective security awareness, keep it focused

Switch book coverIn their book, “Switch: How to Change Things When Change is Hard” authors Chip and Dan Heath examine how influencing humans to change requires appealing to two parts of the brain: the rational and the emotional. Since the emotional part of our brain often gets frustrated when asked to make huge changes, Chip and Dan recommend that we “shrink the change” to change behavior in the face of resistance.

The Heaths cite financial guru Dave Ramsey’s “Debt Snowball” strategy as an effective example of shrinking the change. For people mired in a mountain of debt, this strategy advocates paying off their smallest debts first – regardless of interest rates. Although this flies in the face of conventional financial wisdom, it is a lot easier for people to remain focused by paying off a $200 debt than it is to pay off $200 of a $20k debt. It’s easier for our brains to process manageable changes, and when we feel like change is manageable, we’re more likely to implement it.

To improve security awareness, think marketing

Security awareness is a term that often makes IT security pros cringe. It brings to mind images of mind-numbing training or of ineffectual posters and stress balls urging employees to change their passwords frequently.

Based on years of experience working with enterprises and other large organizations, we are launching a new blog series, “7 Principles Critical to Security Awareness Programs”, that will offer some insight in concepts we have incorporated in our solution to demonstrably improve security awareness for our customers.

The first topic we will address is marketing.

Changing behavior is one of the greatest challenges security officers face when implementing security awareness programs. Convincing people to change is hard in any arena, but when it comes to security – an area which most users neither know nor care much about – it’s especially difficult. We can learn a lot about changing behavior from a source security pros are often wary of: marketers.

An untapped resource to improve threat detection

Speaking in front of the House Committee on Special Intelligence earlier this year, Kevin Mandia (CEO of Mandiant) remarked that, “One of the most valuable resources in detecting and responding to cyber attacks is accurate and timely threat intelligence.”  Despite its value, many organizations don’t have a way to get timely threat intelligence.

How can organizations improve in this area? If you know anything about us, it probably won’t shock you that we’re encouraging enterprises to focus on their users as a source of real-time threat intelligence. Given that the vast majority of targeted attacks focus on the end user as the primary point of entry, many compromises go through employees first, making them a potential (and largely untapped) source of intelligence about threats. Up until now, however, we’ve focused solely on the end user’s ability to recognize cyber attacks. We’ve proven users can be trained to improve their behavior toward phishing attacks, and we believe they are capable of more.

How to defend against longline phishing attacks

A report from ProofPoint released at the RSA conference discussed what is supposedly a new phishing technique dubbed “longline” phishing.  The report touts “longlining” as the newest way criminals are sending phishing emails in efforts to bypass technical controls.  Mass customization of emails allows criminals to fly under the radar of most email filters and successfully deliver spear-phishing emails to a larger number of email users at a single organization.  This tactic combines the best of both worlds from the criminal’s standpoint, but it doesn’t really change the game in terms of defending against phishing attacks, as your users still provide the most effective line of defense against the phishing threat.

Whether “longline” phishing is actually a new type of attack or not, Security Officers should focus on the fact that adversaries will continue to modify their attack strategies to circumvent or evade technical controls in an attempt to directly exploit humans. This is why it’s increasingly critical for organizations to invest in proven and effective behavioral change programs that educate users about the attacks that target them.