PhishMe Closes $13 Million Investment with Paladin Capital Group and Aldrich Capital Partners

LEESBURG, Va., March 26, 2015 — PhishMe® Inc., the leading provider of phishing threat management solutions that empower employees to be a layer of human security sensors against phishing, malware, and drive-by attacks, today announced it has raised $13 million in Series B funding led by existing investor Paladin Capital Group and new investor Aldrich Capital Partners. This round brings PhishMe’s total funding amount to more than $15 million. As part of the agreement, Raheel (Raz) Zia, Partner at Aldrich Capital, will join PhishMe’s board of directors as an observer.

Detecting a Dridex Variant that Evades Anti-virus

Attackers constantly tweak their malware to avoid detection. The latest iteration of Dridex we’ve analyzed provides a great example of malware designed to evade anti-virus, sandboxing, and other detection technologies.

How did we get our hands on malware that went undetected by A/V? Since this malware (like the majority of malware) was delivered via a phishing email, we received the sample from a user reporting the phishing email using Reporter.

The Return of NJRat

NJRat is a remote-access Trojan that has been used for the last few years. We haven’t heard much about NJRat since April 2014, but some samples we’ve recently received show that this malware is making a comeback. ( For some background on NJRat,  a 2013 report from Fidelis Cybersecurity Solutions at General Dynamics detailed indicators, domains, and TTP’s in conjunction with cyber-attacks using NJRat.)

Dridex Code Breaking – Modify the Malware to Bypass the VM Bypass

Post Updated on March 25

The arrival of spring brings many good things, but it’s also prime season for tax-themed phishing emails. A partner of ours recently reported an email with the subject “Your Tax rebate” that contained an attachment with Dridex and password-protected macros to hinder analysis. If you read this blog, this story should sound familiar, but this particular strain took new precautions, such as adding a longer password and using VM detection inside of the code.

Decoding ZeuS Disguised as an .RTF File

While going through emails that were reported by our internal users using Reporter, I came across a particularly nasty looking phishing email that had a .doc attachment. At first when I detonated the sample in my VM, it seemed that the attackers weaponized the attachment incorrectly. After extracting and decoding the shellcode, I discovered a familiar piece of malware that has been used for some time.