Threat Actor Employs Hawkeye Malware with Multiple Infection Vectors

On July 13, 2017, the Phishing Defense Center reviewed a phishing campaign delivering Hawkeye, a stealthy keylogger, disguised as a quote from the Pakistani government’s employee housing society. Although actually a portable executable file [1], once downloaded, it masquerades its icon as a PDF. 

SMILE – New PayPal Phish Has Victims Sending Them a Selfie

Phishing scams masquerading as PayPal are unfortunately commonplace. Most recently, the PhishMe Triage™ Managed Phishing Defense Center noticed a handful of campaigns using a new tactic for advanced PayPal credential phishing. The phishing website looks very authentic compared to off-the-shelf crimeware phishing kits, but also levels-up by asking for a photo of the victim holding their ID and credit card, presumably to create cryptocurrency accounts to launder money stolen from victims.

New Phishing Emails Deliver Malicious .ISO Files to Evade Detection

On May 22, 2017, PhishMe® received several emails with .ISO images as attachments via the Phishing Defense Center. ISO images are typically used as an archive format for the content of an optical disk and are often utilized as the installers for operating system. However, in this case, a threat actor leveraged this archive format as a means to deliver malware content to the recipients of their phishing email. Analysis of the attachments showed that this archive format was abused to deliver malicious AutoIT scripts hidden within a PE file that appears to be a Microsoft Office Document file, which creates a process called MSBuild.exe and caused it to act as a Remote Access Trojan. AutoIT is a BASIC-like scripting language designed for automating Windows GUI tasks and general scripting. Like any scripting or programming language, it can be used for malicious purposes.